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How can I get my tax refund faster?

Want a faster refund? The IRS says that more taxpayers are choosing direct deposit as the way to get their federal tax refunds. The payment is more secure - there is no check to get lost. And, it's more convenient - no special trip to the bank to deposit a check. To request direct deposit, follow the instructions for "Refund" on your tax return.

More than 44 million people had their tax refunds deposited directly into their bank accounts in 2003, a 12 percent increase from the year before. Choosing direct deposit is the best way to guard against having a tax refund misplaced or stolen.

A word of caution - some financial institutions do not allow a joint refund to be deposited into an individual account. Check with your bank or other financial institution to make sure your direct deposit will be accepted.

Also, make sure you give the correct nine-digit routing number for your financial institution and your correct account number when selecting direct deposit. Wrong numbers can cause your refund to be misdirected or delayed.

For more information about direct deposit of your tax refund, check the instructions for your tax form. This and other helpful tips are available in IRS Publication 17, "Your Federal Income Tax." To get a copy, visit the "Forms and Publications" section of the IRS Web site,, or call toll free 1-800-TAX-FORM (1-800-829-3676) to order a free copy.

Source: IRS TAX TIP 2004-19



Reviewed by Brenda Procter, M.S., Consumer and Family Economics, College of Human Environmental Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia












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Last update: Thursday, July 24, 2008




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