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What is pectin?


Pectin is a "gum" or type of fiber found around and inside plant cell walls and is the main ingredient responsible for formation of a gel in jams and jellies. Because pectin is a soluble fiber, it dissolves or swells when put into water.
 

For example, the skin of an apple contains pectin. Tart apples, cranberries, sour plums, concord grapes, quinces, gooseberries, red currants, and crabapples are also especially high in pectin. Under-ripe fruit has more pectin than fully ripe fruit. When you make jams and jellies without added pectin, one-fourth of the fruit should be under-ripe.
 

 

Barbara Willenberg, former Nutritional Sciences Extension Associate, University of Missouri-Columbia and Robin Gammon, LD, RD, Nutritional Sciences Extension Associate, University of Missouri-Columbia
 

 

 

 

Last update: Tuesday, May 05, 2009

 

 


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